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Making a Baseball Bat

I've not yet seen anyone with a completed project for making baseball bats but have been collecting information on them.

Here are some details that I've been storing up. Much of it comes from the Louisville Slugger page: (http://www.slugger.com/tips/batpicker.html)
 
1) Overview: The typical bat is 32-33" long, with a maximum barrel diameter of 2-5/8", and a handle diameter of 15/16 to 1". The taper varies depending on the model, and personal preference.

2) Weight: As a general rule, bigger, stronger players usually prefer a heavier bat for maximum power. Smaller players usually benefit from a lighter bat that allows greater bat speed. To determine the weight that’s right for you, swing a variety of bats and see how much weight you’re comfortable with.

3) Length: Length and weight combine for peak performance. A longer bat gives you greater reach, allowing you to hit balls on the other side of the plate. But remember that a longer bat may be heavier, and the extra weight could slow you down. Like checking the weight, you need to swing bats of different lengths to decide what length best suits you.

4) Barrel diameter: Most players 12 and under should use a 2 1/4” barrel. This is the standard barrel size for Dixie Youth and Little League baseball, although some leagues and travel teams are using larger 2 3/4” barrels. High school and college players are restricted to a maximum barrel diameter of 2 5/8”.

5) League requirements: Virtually all leagues have their own bat requirements and restrictions. For example, high school and college requirements call for BESR-certified bats. To avoid costly surprises, make sure you know all league requirements before you go bat shopping.

6) Size:
 
baseball bat dimensions
 
 

 

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