Woodturning Online

Woodworking Online Forum
It is currently Mon Dec 22, 2014 12:41 pm




Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Cutting End Grain
Author Message
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:13 pm
Posts: 70
Location: Streetman, Texas
Post Cutting End Grain
I did a search and have reviewed some of the threads on this topic but I am still having problems.

I have worked on my "attack angle," "tool sharpness," and type of tool to no avail. The only luck I have had is with a Scorby hollowing tool.

I will keep practicing because I want to make boxes and bowls. I will also go back to my videos and watch them again. Any suggestions or pointers would be appreciated.

_________________
MrRules
Woodturner in Training


Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:04 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Posts: 926
Location: Olde Cape Cod
Post Some Help??
I'm not sure of exactly your problem so it's somewhat hard to provide some leads for a solution but... let me give you my best approach for an end grain box.

I start with a fat spindle between centers. Then put a tenon on each end enabling me to cut them apart at the 1/3, 2/3 line. One piece becomes the top and one becomes the bottom. There are some nice techniques for cutting the wood so that you know the inside size and can properly size the top. I won't get into that here but you can find them in the Projects section of WTO under boxes. Most of the photo tutorials have some technique.

Next put the bottom into a chuck. If I'm reading your message right, this is where you're having your difficulties?

At this point, you have to determine where you want the bottom of your box. I look at the outside and figure out where and mark it with a pencil. Next I want to remove a center core of the box so that I can then start using my turning tools. So, I use a drill in a Jacobs chuck and drill down to just about the bottom.

Now the hollowing of the box starts. My best tool for this is a 3/8" spindle gouge. I cut from the center to the outside sticking the gouge into the new center hole and cutting about 1/16" slices at a time. The flute should allows be faced in the direction of the cut so in this case to the left and should be at ~45 degrees.

I keep making slices under the box is done!

If the side of the box is not "clean', I can start taking cuts with the spindle gouge down the side of the box almost like a traditional bowl cut. But I only want to do this on the upper lip while there is still some meat in the box. Meaning once I've cleaned out the box, the lip is going to be fragile as it's going to be thin allowing it to flex if I apply pressure with my tool. So, I don't cut the top again once I'm deep into the box. This should be the same technique that is used with bowls.

I hope this addresses the issue that is troubling you. If not, you can now tell us where in the process you're getting stumped!

Just as a heads-up, Mike Hunter is testing out a new swan neck handle for his carbide cutters. This new tool is intended to cut boxes and to undercut rims on bowls and things of that sort! I've enjoyed using this tools and the finish almost doesn't need any sanding! So, keep an eye out for this new tool...

Dennis


Sun Feb 17, 2008 6:53 am
Profile WWW

Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 6:31 am
Posts: 870
Post 
I use a pointed gouge for hogging, and don't bother to bore a hole, normally. The point allows you to plunge without skating the tool out, and the roll to one side establishes the cut in either direction. If you keep the handle down a bit, which means a low toolrest, you can clear the trash from this kind of cut well.

For bottoming, I like the Termite or other hook/ring tools. Think of them, and use them as if they were a gouge at 90 to the handle. The round metal-cutting cutters like the Hunter are the same, only the shavings don't flow through, but reverse in the groove and eject. You can also get other shapes from anyone selling machining cutters.

Patience is the key with any cutter and more so a scraper, especially those limited in their capability to remove their own waste. A clog is a catch, and easily done if the end of the tool is hidden. You turn by touch, realizing that the best result comes from minimal insult to the wood.

Image
Image

Done with this pointed grind, and very rapidly. By taking a less aggressive shaving with this, or going to a fingernail grind gouge, scraper, etc, you might do a better surface.

Image


Sun Feb 17, 2008 7:28 am
Profile

Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2007 8:18 pm
Posts: 52
Location: Ohio
Post 
Another vote for the Hunter. It is supposed to be very durable, no sharpening needed; you only rotate the disk to a new section and eventually disposable. I save it for final cuts. I use a gouge or ball end mill for bulk removal.

Don't use the cutter facing up, it is scraping. Just rotate the disk about 45 to 50°, it makes very nice curly shavings. The high shear angle leaves a very smooth surface on end grain.


Sun Feb 17, 2008 7:51 am
Profile

Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 8:11 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Fort Pierce, Fl. USA
Post End-grain
High Speed! Kick it up a notch or two or three!

_________________
Two Hurricanes can make anyone turn wood!


Sun Feb 17, 2008 8:43 am
Profile

Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 9:23 am
Posts: 52
Post 
I hog out the insides of a box with a forstner bit, then use a hook tool to clean the bottom. In the past I would use a bowl gouge to hog out the insides, this work well too.

I've used the Hunter tool, while the bit is nice the shaft way to light. At best it's just good for the finial cut to clean up any fuzzies. IMO this tool is over priced and over rated.


Sun Feb 17, 2008 8:44 am
Profile

Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 7:17 am
Posts: 155
Location: Louisville, KY
Post 
MrRules,

I think I recall from another posting that you are relatively new to bowls and boxes? I am too, and I'm wondering why you're trying end grain boxes/bowls already. Face grain stuff is a lot easier, and you will still be cutting some end grain, just not as much.

That being said, maybe you could describe the problem you're having a little better. It's not very clear from your first posting.


Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:28 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:13 pm
Posts: 70
Location: Streetman, Texas
Post Cutting End Grain
My problem is that when I begin to begin hollowing the cylinder I keep getting catches. I can't seem to get a bowl gouge to start the cut. Maybe the suggestion of drilling a hole to start would help, I will try that tomorrow.

The videos I have watched demonstrate moving the gouge from the outside to the center. I will also work at starting in the center and working to the outside.

I will let you know my progress tomorrow.

_________________
MrRules
Woodturner in Training


Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:50 pm
Profile

Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 3:19 pm
Posts: 263
Location: Mountain Home, Arkansas
Post Re: Cutting End Grain
MrRules wrote:
My problem is that when I begin to begin hollowing the cylinder I keep getting catches. I can't seem to get a bowl gouge to start the cut. Maybe the suggestion of drilling a hole to start would help, I will try that tomorrow.

The videos I have watched demonstrate moving the gouge from the outside to the center. I will also work at starting in the center and working to the outside.

I will let you know my progress tomorrow.


Until last week, I couldn't use a bowl gouge to save my life. Then a friend sharpened mine properly and gave me instructions on how to hold, attack, etc. Get some personal advice. I'll betcha sharpening properly will set you on your way.


Tue Feb 19, 2008 9:25 am
Profile

Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 11:22 am
Posts: 23
Location: Eugene, OR
Post 
Turning the outside is easy. This is normal woodturning and easy to understand what needs to be done. The inside is backwards. It does help, especially when you are just starting, to drill out the inside, or at least drill a pilot hole. Some gouges can do a nice plunge cut (ever see Roy Underhill use a spoon bit to drill holes). Then work from the center low, up to the outside. Think of sharpening a pencil with a knife. You start from the top, and cut down to the point. So when you do the inside, you have to go the other direction. Here scrapers actually can work better than gouges. I haven't used the Hunter tool, but have the Eliminator. It is another micro grail carbide citting disc, and the bar it is on has a 45 degree bevel on it to keep it at a shear angle (if you try to work these tools flat, they get very grabby). They work very well for end grain cutting, and can leave a surface that needs almost no sanding. As always, a scraping cut doesn't leave as nice of a surface as a shear cut surface.
robo hippy


Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:29 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:13 pm
Posts: 70
Location: Streetman, Texas
Post Cutting End Grain
My review of my DVD's has shown that when cutting end grain you should move from the center to the outside of the piece. The picture I had in my mind about moving from the outside to the inside were not end grain works. My mistake, I will continue to practice.

_________________
MrRules
Woodturner in Training


Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:35 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 11 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot] and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group. Color scheme by ColorizeIt.
===============================divider===============================
 

Our Newsletter

We update our home page about monthly to feature a new project, a new article, and a new and hot tool. Then we create a newsletter to alert our subscribers.
We never let anyone use our list, and our subscribers have been wonderfully loyal as a result.

We hope you will try it out!

Click Here To Sign Up For Our Newsletter