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Deft high gloss lacquer
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:19 pm
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Post Deft high gloss lacquer
This is the first time I am using Deft High Gloss lacquer on a Christmas Ornament, which I am currently turning. I have never used deft before. I have always used a standard friction polish, wax and buff. Has any one use deft before? Do you have any tips on using it. I saw a turner using Deft at a show while making some small bird house ornaments. He was used it like friction polish. However, after reading the label on the Deft can, it appears you have to let Deft dry for 30 min or more between each application??? Is this true?? Help, if you know more about this Deft lacquer product??? Thanks. Turner Ted.


Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:37 pm
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
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Location: Olde Cape Cod
Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
My experience with Deft (and other lacquers) is to apply and allow to dry. Additional coats can be applied easily to great more coverage and shine as lacquer bonds to previous layers through a chemical process basically making it all one layer...

I've never seen anyone use it like a friction polish and would suspect that it would get tacky and be hard to handle. But it would be great to hear if anyone has used it this way...

Dennis


Fri Dec 31, 2010 6:41 am
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Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
Use as a French polish is possible with the drop of oil lubricating the pad when it starts to drag.


Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:36 am
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:19 pm
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Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
Well I found out not to use it as a fiction polish. I tried it on a sample piece. It just doest work. It's way to tacky. You have to let it dry for 30 min, if not for 2 hours. That drying time really slows down the turning time. I think, I will make the ornament, sand it and then finish it off the lathe. I like to finish turnings on the lathe and I like using lacquer. But not at the cost of adding days to the turning process. Plus I think, it would be easier to just spray the lacquer on with a low pressure sprayer, if I'm going to finish the turning off the lathe. Thanks!!

Turner Ted


Fri Dec 31, 2010 8:10 am
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Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
Friction polish takes advantage of shellac flowing at a relatively low temperature. Can't do that with modern lacquers.

Shellac can be built quickly to as thick and shiny as you please, and it's work you can do while watching the Big Ten teams get systematically slaughtered, or other more pleasant TV. Used to finish in the ready room waiting on ambulance calls. Alcohol rinse served two purposes then.

One of my older (~10yrs) ornaments snapped before we sent the tree back to the woods. Needs a new coat of wax, but it's western red cedar and a LOT of soaked-up shellac, applied smooth. Image


Sun Jan 02, 2011 9:29 am
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Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 4:07 pm
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Location: Norman, Ok, USA
Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
Hi Ted.
A lot of turners I know and this includes me, use Deft in a manner that closely approximates friction polish and if one wasn't watching real close may go away thinking it was a friction polish. I'll explain the whole process (it's no big secret). Deft is the preferred lacquer because of it's retarders and it is mixed with thinner to about 50:50 (abouts, close to, etc. is the order of the day, real scientific), this is applied to the piece while it's still in the lathe by brushing it on. The brushing is more like slathering it on, in that the whole piece is kept wet for a few minutes. Most of us that use this process keep the brush in the jar where we keep our lacquer mix, the brush will need to be a natural bristle or else the bristles will dissolve (I favor a good quality chip brush with part of the handle sawn off to fit in the jar). Often a turner will have on hand a jar of thinner (hot dry weather this is a necessity) to help the spread of the lacquer mix. The slathering on of the lacquer mix is immediately followed by wiping the piece with a paper towel (don't turn on the lathe, just yet). If the piece dictates, multiple applications are made (until in no longer drinks up the lacquer mix). After the last application and most likely with a small piece like an ornament the piece is buffed on the lathe with a paper towel, followed by waxing or more preferrably taking the piece through the Beall process or to the paint area for further finishing. Many turners only finish with the lathe application and Beall process. I have never seen this done with anything but solvent based lacquer and the lacquer used will need to have retarder in it which of course Deft has without any additional additives needed other than thinner. It may take a few pieces to learn with but once learned you will be happy you did, then others may think you are putting on a friction polish.
BJ


Tue Jan 04, 2011 8:09 pm
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:36 pm
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Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
I know that Dale Nish in Utah teaches how to use Deft as a sanding sealer/ Finish. Its pretty much a brush on, let dry then cut it back down to the bare wood. Apply the finish you want. The nice thing is it keeps oils and the like from darkening the wood by acting as a barrier. I know CSUSA has free instructions on the website under "instructions" I think. I like it.


Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:44 pm
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:19 pm
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Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
This was very Helpfull. I didnt know you were to cut the deft 50/50% with a lacquer thinner. That would help speed up the drying time. What do you use to cut the deft. Can you use denatured alcohol??


Mon Jan 10, 2011 2:33 pm
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Location: Norman, Ok, USA
Post Re: Deft high gloss lacquer
Use only lacquer thinner to thin lacquer. There is different mixes to make lacquer thinner, however this is more for the car painters rather than wood workers. Thinning lacquer shouldn't change the drying time. If a longer drying time is needed "retarder" is available, however Deft already has it in it and there is a limit of how much of whatever that can be added. You don't want to fast of dry down doing so will cause blushing (condensed water in your finish).
BJ


Mon Jan 10, 2011 3:23 pm
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